Q&A with Kellyn Mitchell, Web Developer: What's Misunderstood About Developers & 5 Tips for Success

What’s one thing you think is misunderstood about web developers?

In its simplest form, there is more to development than just writing codes. Though it is always my main priority to produce solutions that are as efficient as they are quick, coding takes time, especially when it comes to unforeseen changes and additions.

In the interest of all fairness, I will admit there are some web developers that take way too long ? several months to a year or two ? just for a small or medium websites, and well…they will not be developers for long.

With all this said, I’ve heard the phrase “this should be simple” from enough clients to say that sometimes things are simple, and other times coding is not that simple and takes time to perform accurately and without problems. Remember, fast and cheap can sometimes mean quick and buggy (cue the Band-Aid to fix the leaky hose). Adequate time should also be allowed after development is finished for final testing of the site, which must be thorough.

 

After working as a consultant, describe your transition into working at Symmetri.

A lot of times when you are brought into a contract situation, you are expected to create solutions for a set of tasks pertaining to that project and that project alone, almost similar to a “hired gun” if you will. At Symmetri, I have been given the opportunity to be a part of a team and invest time into long-term solutions for tasks we face consistently across projects.

There is a very diverse range of talent and expertise amongst the members of the Symmetri family, and the collaborative culture we have allows us all to benefit and grow not only as individuals but a team as a whole.

At Symmetri, I feel like the culture is ever-evolving, and there is a common goal to become regarded as experts in the industry. And it shows with the type of work we produce.

 

What are your favorite types of websites to work on?

I love to learn new things and be challenged, but more importantly I really get a kick out of being a part of something awesome ? and we design awesome solutions. Our client base is very diverse and our team is extremely good at what they do: they love to push the envelope when it comes to our clients’ digital presence. Not only do I get to develop amazing solutions, I get to learn something new in the process…the double win!

 

What would your advice be for someone wanting to become a web developer?

First and foremost, I’d say get educated: There is a plethora of knowledge out there and a lot of it is it free or open-source. Learn the basics and take your time to embrace best practices.

Pay close attention to industry standards and leverage the resources around you: There are so many amazing code generators, open-source libraries and communities of aspiring industry experts; get out there and immerse yourself.

Adapt and evolve immediately: Trends change, standards change, mediums of viewing content change. Stay in tune with what the people want. Understand it’s not about what we want to make, but what the people want.

Think ahead: Every day isn’t a good day in development. Clients change their minds, code breaks for no reason, browsers sometimes are uncooperative.  It’s a process and must be approached that way. Be proactive and try to use a forward thinking whenever possible.

Love what you do: I take my craft very seriously, and I dedicate a tremendous amount of time into perfecting it. I take pride in that.